Membership

We accomplish our goals through the efforts of our members, who currently number more than 80 men and women from Manchester and neighboring towns. The club was established in October of 1926 and has a rich history of community involvement.
 

BENEFITS OF MEMBERSHIP
For annual dues of $35.00 per year, members receive:
  • A membership card for a 10% discount at Woodland Gardens, Action Water Gardens and Botticello Nursery.
  • A Club Yearbook, Constitution and By-Laws and Club Handbook.
  • Opportunity to benefit from informative presentations, and free advice from experienced gardeners
  • Advance notification of gardening related activities and the hospitality and generosity of the members.
  • Enrollment in the Federated Garden Clubs of Connecticut and receipt of their newsletters that offer gardening advice and information on regional and national activities.
     

Guests are invited to become members after attending three of our regular meetings. Please check our meeting calendar and join us for an informative and entertaining evening.
 

HISTORY
In the early years, key projects included the purchase and installation of shrubs and trees at schools, museums and hospitals. Post World War II, in addition to continuing this work, the Club expanded its efforts to include the planting of public gardens and conservation work. In the last fifty years, the Club has continued to diversify its efforts and its membership.

The roaring twenties saw Manchester as a community in resurgence. With the arrival of new businesses and banks in town, new homes were popping up all over town. And with those homes an interest in gardening began to be embraced by Manchester society. Supported by the continued interest in the U.S. in horticultural specimens, these garden enthusiasts began to meet (and compete!) in order to share specimens, ideas and passions. When the gavel strike opened the first meeting, there were just a few members, mostly men at the time.

The influence of the Manchester Garden Club grew, and with the support of local celebrities, became known statewide. During the presidency of William E. Buckley (noted author and gardener) it was not unusual to see the likes of Katherine Hepburn motoring through town on the way to the Buckley estate to meet and be tutored by Dr. Buckley. During and after World War II, the membership shifted to include mostly women, and remained that way until the past few years.